Get More Retweets Shares and Followers With These 5 Tips

Get More Retweets Shares and Followers With These 5 Tips

Writing Better Posts will Get Your Message Further in the Social Stream

The social marketing space is extremely crowded and loud.  Twitter alone has approximately 500 MILLION tweets flying out PER DAY! (approximately 6 million every SECOND) Twitter is a stream flowing wild and full with interesting content and … not-so-interesting clutter. Your goal on your social media channels is to share interesting and helpful content that others find good enough that they pluck it out of the stream and pass it along through ReTweets and shares.

To help your social media messages stand out and be read more often, here are 5 things to keep in mind:

  1. Don’t be afraid to speak your mind.

    Being controversial isn’t a bad thing on social media channels… occasionally.  Tell us how you feel about something, while still being civil. People want to chime in and agree with you… or disagree with you.  If you are just quoting everyone else, it gets old. It’s like that old saying, “Be yourself…unless you’re a jerk, then be someone else!”

     

  2. Become a better writer!

    blogger, blog, content marketing

    Punch a bit of drama, humor or even intrigue into your tweets and posts where you can.  Can you say it in a way that is more entertaining or humorous?  “Craving that last piece of cake” can be tweaked to read, “I kept hearing my name being called in a seductive voice. I turned to find the last piece of cake winking at me.” Just more fun to read and pass along! “Busy day ahead” can be made more interesting AND helpful by telling us a bit about you with, “Working with clients to tame their clutter today-I love scary closets” or “Busy day ahead expanding minds–this could get messy!”

  3. Share it More Than Once.

    We all know that once is never enough for anything great, so why not share your post more than once. Unless it is time sensitive, put that post out today in the morning and then again perhaps tomorrow afternoon. Keep in mind that people are not sitting at their computer or on their phone JUST reading your posts (I know…shocking!). I’m sorry to burst that bubble, but people are reading lots of content and perhaps they missed your post today but will catch it tomorrow. Try adding two different images to your posts and see which captures the attention better. Speaking of images…

  4. Add more photos and videos to your posts to allow people to SEE what you are saying.

    photos for social media posts, images for social
    Social media is all about photos, videos, and all things visual. Make sure and utilize this on your posts.  While there are LOADS of great sites to find stock images [see: STOP USING THESE CRAPPY IMAGES ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS] you can also create your own with photos you snap, images you create with tools like Canva or other tools, or fun Gifs you find or create!

  5. Be quiet sometimes.

    On any social media platform, my philosophy (that even I do not follow at times) is BE HELPFUL, BE INTERESTING, or BE QUIET!  If you post tweets when there is nothing interesting or helpful to say…you might start being ignored.  Of course, we are talking about SOCIAL media, so there are times you are socializing and chatting it up with folks, but if you are just posting what you are doing without asking yourself “Can I make this more interesting or helpful?” you might want to just go for a walk.

    social media marketing, digital agency


YOUR TURN TO SHARE:
Of all the posts you have shared in the past week, what was it that grabbed YOUR attention and inspired you to pass them along?

Here is our FREE resource to help you use Twitter to build your business — Download Now:

How to build business with Twitter

@GinaSchreck

I Have to Create a Facebook Page for My Company But Don’t Want it Linked to My PERSONAL Profile

I Have to Create a Facebook Page for My Company But Don’t Want it Linked to My PERSONAL Profile

(Updated 05/11/19)

You’ve been asked by your manager to set up a Facebook Page for the business and most of what you read says you have to do this from your personal profile.  You don’t want this business page attached to YOUR personal profile. After all, what happens when you leave (hey, it can happen!) Perhaps it’s YOUR business, but you still don’t want to link it to a personal profile that you use for family connections and REAL friends.

FEAR NOT!  You CAN do this. It may feel like you’ve been asked to turn over your personal diary for the world to read on your business page, but I assure you, your secrets are safe. Even though you are linking them for access, you are not linking them for the world to view.

So let’s understand something up front.  When I create a business page, it is like creating a website for a business. I will need access to the backend of the site to load or change content, but nowhere on the site does it have to give my name or contact information, unless I want it to.  It is the same with Facebook.  Your PERSONAL profile is your access point or portal into Facebook but from there you can create and manage as many business pages as you’d like.  You don’t need a special login and password for each page, and you don’t have to share passwords with anyone.  (If your mother didn’t tell you this a long time ago, you should NEVER give your passwords to anyone. Whether they are your manager or not.  There is no need for anyone to use YOUR password.)  You log in and go to the pages you have admin access to. Your manager, or other team members, can log into their own personal profile and have the same access point if they are made an admin for the page.

dont share passwords

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If, and I hear this all the time, your manager or co-worker does not have a Facebook account of their own, so they ask to log into your account to check the business page, tell them you would like their login information to their bank account to check on your payroll first! They need to create their own account–it’s FREE and they don’t have to ever use it or share their horrifying vacation pics. If they need to log into a site, including Facebook, they need their own login credentials. There are just some things, like a glass of milk, a toothbrush or social media passwords, that should never be shared with other people.

When you are logged in from your personal profile and then jump over to your business page (easy to switch between the two from the dropdown arrow in the upper right) people on the outside do not know you are associated with the page. They cannot see any of your personal information and they are NOT automatically made FRIENDS of yours if they LIKE the business page.

With that out of the way, let’s get started!  To begin, log into your own personal Facebook profile and THEN go to Facebook.com/pages and click CREATE PAGE in the upper right.  You will be asked to name your page and select the category (not-for-profit, local business, etc. And don’t worry too much about the categories since they can be changed at any time. Your name is not so easy to change so choose wisely!).

Https://Facebook.com/pages

settig up a facebook business page

Fill out the basic info and you are well on your way!

In the SETTINGS for your new page, look to the left and find PAGE ROLES. This is where you add an additional admin to the page, such as a team member or your manager (who will need to have a Facebook account).  You can select different ROLES for people such as EDITOR (someone who cannot add or remove others but can post and comment AS THE PAGE.) You can select MODERATOR, ANALYST, even JOBS MANAGER to give specific rights without allowing people to add or remove others. If you leave the organization, you simply make sure there is an ADMIN assigned to the page and then remove yourself in this same area.

Now that we’ve covered how to set up your page, let’s move onto the REAL WORK…. creating and posting content every day!

That’s where things get scary! Happy posting!

Scared of setting up Facebook business page from my personal profile

No, No, Not Content Creation

Gina Schreck is the founder of SocialKNX. Their teams help organizations connect to their world and convert LIKES into DOLLARS! Be sure to find more geeky goodness on our own Facebook Page! 

RELATED ARTICLE: Setting Up a Facebook Business Page without a Personal Profile

DOWNLOAD THIS FREE GUIDE to help you get things set up correctly:

how to set up facebook business page correctly

7 Ways Your Hotel Can Win With Social Media

7 Ways Your Hotel Can Win With Social Media

Hotel websites are very similar. They all have the same stock photos of beautiful people sitting in beautiful lobbies or the typical hotel bedroom and the navigation panel on the side to book the room.  To the average consumer, your hotel website does not do much to differentiate itself from the others.  However, there are several things your property can be doing with social media to blow every competitor out of the water.

Social media for hotels, social business

Here are 7 Ways Your Hotel Can Win With Social:

Listen to the social vine and have your hotel engage early

I don’t mean to listen to someone saying they are thinking of making a trip to Denver and you send a 20% off promo code. I mean use Twitter’s geo-location feature to listen for conversations going on in your city and then jump in and engage in the conversation with fun facts about the city, events that might be taking place that week or “DID YOU KNOW” trivia about your property or area. Ask what brings them to Denver and share a favorite restaurant or place of interest with them. Let them know you can help in any way possible AND oh, by the way, you want to offer them a special deal only available to your Twitter friends. Don’t offer the same worn out deal that they can find on any travel site.

Have your “Social Concierge” welcome a guest BEFORE they arrive

Sure, after booking a hotel room many hotels send a confirmation email, but why not encourage them to connect with you on Twitter,  Facebook, Instagram, or any other sites your Social Concierge is connecting with guests.  Show them you are on duty and ready to make their experience extra special. You can now extend the guest experience from the booking to the arrival, and of course, all the way through to their next booking.

social media in hotels

Provide helpful information to guests

Have the Social Concierge provide guests with seasonal weather information suggested packing items like winter coats or fall sweaters. Put together a list of things ahead of time for each season and then place the link in a tweet or Facebook post to them. On Twitter and Facebook, you can continue the relationship building and find out if they are coming for business or perhaps a special occasion that you can now help make more productive or more special.

  1. Send a link with local events happening in your town and suggested sites to see. Send a list of restaurants in your area and shopping malls around. The concierge at the desk isn’t the only one who can help them make plans.

  2. Let your guests know you’re online and ready to answer any questions, before during or after their stay. This can personalize the experience and nip any problems in the bud. It can also relieve your front desk team from some of the traffic that gathers to ask simple questions.

hospitality and social media

Watch for SOCIAL check-ins

Be sure and have your social “check-in deals set up” and watch those check-ins daily to also welcome folks who may have come into your social range through these channels. A person is always stunned when they check in on a social channel and someone replies to them with a WELCOME note. It shows you are listening.

Don’t send a typical survey after a guest leaves

These are impersonal and most guests feel as if it goes into a shoebox under the GM’s desk anyway, never to be looked at or acted upon. You do the work. Reach out and ask them via Twitter or Facebook, if their stay was excellent. Get specific feedback and if the guest is delighted, then you can ask if they’d be willing to share the sentiments on TripAdvisor, Google My Biz or Facebook recommendations. Encourage them to share any favorite photos or memories from their trip. Keep the relationship growing!

What are some other ways you can reach out through the social channels that guests are flooding, to create a more unique customers experience?  Have you had any hotel or retail store do something creative that WOW’d you?  We’d love to hear.

 

Connect with Gina on Twitter.

How can we reach out and help YOU connect to your world?

Someone’s Talking About You on Social Media…What Will You Do?

Someone’s Talking About You on Social Media…What Will You Do?

talking about brand review sites

I know most people are skeptical about Yelp, Google Local, TripAdvisor and other review sites, and none more skeptical than a business owner with a bad review posted on one of these sites. “It’s probably one of my competitors, posting a false review.” Whether it is your evil competitor trying to take you down or your newest fan raving about you, these sites cannot be ignored.

With over 178 million monthly users on Yelp, 260 million users posting reviews on TripAdvisor , and 2.23 BILLION active users on Facebook, (as of June 2018) all itching to have their voices heard, companies have to monitor their brands and make time to engage and reply to these reviewers.  With a little attention to these reviews, you can turn around a bad experience and build loyalty, and on good reviews you can boost the love and create a viral spread.

  1. Reply to comments and social reviews quickly 

    When someone takes the time to write any comment about your business, they are giving you a gift. Don’t leave that gift unacknowledged.  Make sure you have notifications turned on for comments on your website and that you either check once or twice a day all of your social channels or turn those notifications on as well so you don’t miss comments there. There is nothing worse than leaving a question or comment and never hearing back. Whether you receive a great compliment or a horrible review, be sure to thank the person for taking the time to provide you with feedback. One thing I learned from raising my 4 children is, what you recognize or reward will be repeated. Thank people for bringing you the feedback.

  2. Apologize…SINCERELY!

    Again, something I learned from my kids during those teenaged years; an apology that starts with SOR-RY and includes BUT… is not an apology. It is an excuse. I had the opportunity to sit with a woman in a cable company call center, Mary Delgado, who was the escalation desk for the vilest of customers. She took call after call from people who were cussing at her, screaming into their phones (over cable TV, no less).  Mary would listen without interrupting and then her first response would be, “Oh my goodness. I am so sorry you have had to go through this. This should NOT have happened.  I am going to get this taken care of.” It was so classic. You could almost see the person on the end of the line squirming as they tried to come up with another comeback. Their anger couldn’t compete with her willingness to own the problem and seek a resolution.  Sometimes all a wronged customer wants is to be heard and to hear a sincere apology.

  3. Don’t delete the comment

    Show, in public, how you are going to make things right or at least ensure it doesn’t happen again.  Most review sites don’t allow you to delete a review, but Facebook does if the comment is left on the page and not in the review area. I have seen companies delete negative reviews, thinking the person will just quietly go away. If you delete an angry comment on your site, the customer will take it to a public space where you have no control and it WILL get ugly. I am shocked to see review sites where a company either denies that the problem happened, basically calling the customer a lier (Most classic is the Blue Sky Hostel owner in Glasgow who calls the customer a blind, fat, a retard and the firestorm of comments back and forth between the owner, the angry customer and everyone else who chimed in for entertainment that wasn’t available on any television network. You can find the Buzzfeed post here with screenshots. Which is another reason why you should never delete a negative comment–the person has most likely taken screenshots in case they need to go to the public.

    So what can you do about it? If it is something you need to investigate to find out if it is true, you can HIDE a comment on Facebook, but on any site, you should contact the person who posted the review and ask them to contact you via private message to resolve the issue. When they don’t respond, you can assume the person isn’t looking for a resolution.

    Whether it’s a negative review, an old embarrassing photo of yourself, or anything that shows up on the web that you wish would just go away, the one thing you CAN do is put out lots of good content that is attached to your brand, to push those old reviews down. It will take time, but it works.

  4. Ask for reviews and recommendations on your social media sites.

    When a delighted customer tells you they had great service or loves your product, immediately ask if they would mind writing a review for you on one of your social sites.  Let them know how it helps your business and then thank them.  Talk to your team and remind them to think digital first and get those recommendations in video, on social sites or anywhere else that the world can see.

I’d love to hear from you. Have you left reviews on a social review site? Do you expect a response? How do you feel if you get one?

If you need help keeping up with all of the responses and connecting with your social audience, contact us today.…it’s what we do!

Contact me on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn

social media marketing small business, hotels, social business
 

How to Know If Your Business Is Suited For Social Media

How to Know If Your Business Is Suited For Social Media

I have a friend who would never allow people to pop in or come over if her house was not perfectly clean and orderly.  She had two small children and she said she didn’t want people to see the mess.  I always laughed and told her, if that were true for me, I would never have a visitor, announced or not.

There are some businesses that can’t allow people to pop in on them for fear they may see something less than perfect as well. They want everything well scripted and professionally produced before they will allow the world to stop by on their social media channels.  They don’t like live-streaming for fear of being imperfect and some don’t even like allowing comments from fans on social media channels for fear of what they might post.

The problem with social media is it should be more… SOCIAL! It is “in-the-moment,” spontaneous, and yes…sometimes MESSY.  If your team is waiting for approvals and meetings to take place before a response or post can go up, and you can’t share or ReTweet something from someone else’s profile because it was not screened ahead of time, your brand will struggle to be “social.” Social media is the place to let your audience peek behind the curtain and see how your products are made,  your books are written, your team learns together, and how you play.

social business

Some still think social media marketing is best for B2C businesses, but the reality is whether you are a B2B or a B2C, we are all in P2P relationships. Person to Person.  We want to connect as one person sharing and providing value to another person. People like to see who they are dealing with at another business.  They also want to connect with real people.

Like inviting a new friend over for coffee, social media in a B2B or B2C environment allows you to get closer and begin building the trust needed to establish a relationship.  While people may not want to become “besties” with their cell phone provider, they do like to know they have someone there that cares and can help answer questions when they have one.

When I started researching for this post, I found a few B2B companies that were doing an amazing job with their ability to be social and show a human side to a rather technical industry, and of course I found a few that should close their social windows, draw the shades & sit quietly until people pass by.

anti-social business, hide from social

 

Let’s take a look at a few good and bad examples of businesses on social media:

AGCO Corporation

AGCO offers a full line of tractors, combines, and other agriculture equipment.  They sell to distributors who sell to the end-user (farmer or rancher).  You may think an equipment company would have no place on social media sites, but you’d be wrong.  This company and their 5 brands are connecting and having real conversations with their distributors, fans and those seeking answers about the equipment.

What they share:

Lots of informational and helpful tips mixed with fun and more playful or personal photo posts.  One that I found showed the spontaneity and fun. (Rainbows don’t wait for a committee to approve them.).

B2B social media example AGCO on Facebook

 What social sites they are active on:

They have a WordPress Blog, Facebook, Twitter, and my favorite was their YouTube channel.  They have an incredible collection of educational and informative videos (thousands of videos!) from their own team as well as from their community members.

What we can learn from them:

Provide as much information and helpful content as possible and be where your customers are to answer their questions. Be casual and conversational. Allow your community to be involved in teaching others about your products or services.

 

The Funeral Industry

This industry is one that you might shudder to think of on social media, but when you consider the fact that at least most of us, will need to secure the services of a funeral home sooner or later (hopefully much later), some make it a very “lively” social experience on their pages and profiles.  Most funeral homes are very active in their communities and one, that shares great information as well as these fun community event photos, is Bartolomeo & Perotto in New York.

What they share:

Tips for caregivers and families dealing with aging parents or loved ones.  Resources such as Meals on Wheels, hospice care contact information, local blood drives and fun charity walks and runs.  You can find information on creative memorial services and explanations on cremation versus burial services.  You will also find information on events they are involved in, such as their annual butterfly release (photo below), the 9/11 memorial parade, and their very popular “Stockings for Soldiers” campaign.  The community shares the posts, shows up at their events and supports the causes that are close to their hearts.

funeral homes on social media

What social sites funeral homes are active on: 

While we found Pinterest boards filled with cemetery statues, memorial ideas, songs for memorial services, floral arrangements, urns and more there were only a few funeral homes who had created boards. Most of the content was user-generated.  We found many funeral homes on Facebook and Twitter, and a few savvy enough to answer the many questions consumers have about funerals on YouTube.

 

Funeral homes on social media management company

And of course there are businesses that try to fit into a typical social mold but their target audiences don’t want to talk there. While I believe any business can learn to be social, the platforms each chooses may need to be very different.  A Blog can be a safer place to learn about bipolar disorder than on Facebook, where I wouldn’t want anyone to see that I liked a page let alone that I asked a question or commented there.  YouTube videos, and perhaps even Instagram are a better place for someone to learn how to treat acne than for me to follow and engage with @ZitBeGone on Twitter.

Medical and dental offices can be very social if they share helpful, fun and interesting information for their audiences.  However, if you take out the fun and interesting posts, it leaves only content about veneers and crowns.  There are only so many posts one can take showing the inside of people’s mouths combined with information on root canals.  We did find several who know how to be social and are sharing fun community events along with helpful information.  Love to Dr. Jim and his Tooth Fairies at Southwest Pediatric Dentistry. (We spent 6 years visiting these fun folks with 3 out 4 of our kids in braces!)
We can see the personality of a business on social media sites.

Dentists and Doctors on social media social marketing company

Download our FREE assessment to see HOW SOCIAL IS YOUR BUSINESS and get tips and tools to improve starting today!

business social media assessment

So before hanging your social shingle out letting people know you are on social media, you might want to ask a few questions first:

  1. Is our potential audience active on social media sites?
  2. Which sites and platforms?
  3. Do any of our competitors have active communities on these sites?
  4. Can we write content, regularly, that is more casual in nature and “social” than what is found on our website?  (You cannot simply regurgitate your web content over and over and call it social marketing.)
    (Here are 30 ideas of things to post on your social media accounts when you don’t know what to say.)
  5. Are we okay with sharing photos, videos, and stories of our team and the daily activities behind the curtain?
  6. Are we okay with allowing our community to share their stories, videos, and photos on our pages and profiles or their own?
  7. Are we okay with people posting feedback about our company, our products and services and even our team members on our pages?
  8. Do we have a plan for how to respond to social feedback? Is it written down? (Read: How to Prepare for a Social Media Disaster)
  9. What is the personality of our brand?  Not what do we WISH it was, but what IS IT currently?  Write the words that describe your brand and your team.  Don’t portray one personality online and shock people when they come in to do business with you and your team members.
  10. Are we prepared to let our social marketing team (or person) have some freedom to engage with people and respond in the moment without needing to micromanage?

Being successfully social means being a little vulnerable, and a little more honest about who we really are when the staged photos of fake team members are taken down and the perfect web copy fades away. Being successfully social means having a sense of humor and a more playful spirit. It means letting people pop in without worrying about them seeing a few toys and crumbs on the floor.

anti social media

 

How do you feel about letting people see behind the curtain of your business? I’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or connect with me on your favorite social media channel… I’m everywhere YOU want to be! @GinaSchreck

Do you need help setting up your social marketing strategy?  Contact one of our fun team members and watch out for the blocks on the floor.